Memory in Amber

Memory-in-Amber

The black and yellow taxi pulled out onto the busy road and headed directly towards the sun, suspended like an enormous balloon in the hot, dust-smeared sky. The vapours above the city were so thick that Elsa could stare directly at it. Overpopulation and the resulting industrial pollution stole the sun’s incandescence and reduced its intensity to that of a vapid paper lantern.
It was Elsa’s first time in Delhi and she really wished that she wasn’t here, that she hadn’t been made to come. What she really wanted was to be back home, in Melbourne, dealing with all that was happening there; not here trying to navigate her way through this strange, crazy city and the alien culture that sustained it.
Anton, her manager, had cornered her just the week before.
“Oh Elsa, there you are. Look, I’m sorry to spring this on you at the last minute, but there’s a pharmaceutical conference in India in less than two weeks. Collin can’t take my place because he’s sick, and I can’t send Teresa,” he said, and pulled a regretful expression. “So I’m afraid it will have to be you. The paperwork is in the office. I’ll fast-track the visa for you – just leave your passport with Veronica, she’ll know what to do.”
“But Anton … I can’t! I’ve got a lot going on at the moment. My dad’s really sick and …”
Matthew is leaving me, she had wanted to scream at him. Only what did he care about Matthew, it wasn’t as if they were even married or anything.
“Look, I’m really sorry, Elsa,” he pressed. He didn’t look all that sorry, just a tad apologetic at the very most – but his expression was suddenly full of subtext.
If you want any kind of future with Epsilon Industries, you will do what I ask you to.
Feeling cornered, Elsa sighed heavily.
“How long will I be gone for?”
“Just two weeks, that’s all. You’ll be back in no time. A break away will do you good … oh, and by the way, the conference is in Jaipur, but I’d like you to first drop in at the Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Delhi and connect with Jason Strimel. He’s sort of like my Yank equivalent in the company. He’s there monitoring something or other. Please do convey to him how sorry I am that I can’t be there in person.”
Yeah right! So I’m the patsy …

-oOo-

Elsa glared at the back of the taxi driver’s head as if he was on Anton’s payroll and all of this was somehow his fault, and she could get at least a measure of revenge by throwing mental darts in his direction.
The man had dark skin and dishevelled black hair and thick eyebrows that hung over his eyes like old fashioned shutters, ready to be pulled down at a moment’s notice against temperamental weather or grumpy foreign women. The eyes themselves were warm enough and engaging, but she could hardly believe how poor his grasp of English was. Yet he had faked it well enough when he and his mates had jostled her along with her luggage into his car, all the while repeating, “This taxi is best in Delhi for you, Madam! Best reliable taxi for your good self!”
She was actually grateful to be rescued from the overwhelming horde of other men contesting for her patronage. When she had given him her destination he had responded with such a convincing and enthusiastic “Yes Madam, directly there we are to be going now!” that she had let herself sink in the taxi’s rear seat with a sigh of relief.
It was only when they were well out of the airport grounds and truly embedded in dense traffic that he had turned around and spoken again.
“Where Madam go, please?”
“I thought you said you knew where it was!”
“Yes, yes, Madam! Most certainly I know … but forget.” He slapped his forehead as if to chastise himself for being such a dullard. “Such easily I be forgetting! Where Madam go?”
“Oh for goodness’ … I need to get to the Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences!”
She had to repeat that a number of times and all she got in response was the man’s idiotic grin and a weird head wobble that she couldn’t even begin to decipher. Eventually he asked her another, more direct question.
“Madam! What is address be?”
Fuming, she dug out her mobile and found the text message from Anton.
“Merrawlee … Bada-purr road in Pussviah,” she stammered.
After her third attempt she stopped trying to articulate what to her was unpronounceable and waited until a traffic light forced him to stop. She then shoved the phone in front of his face.
He squinted at the screen for a long moment and then proceeded to laugh in a wholly exaggerated and unconvincing way.
“Ah – ha-ha-ha! Mehrauli-Badarpur Road in Puspvihar,” he said, the names rolling eloquently off his tongue, exasperating her even further. “Yes, yes, Madam. Ha-ha-ha! Already I am knowing it, too well I am knowing it …”
He continued to laugh and mutter to himself for a while longer, until the traffic around him lurched forward again and the business of driving absorbed all of his attention.
Elsa, too, soon forgot her angst as the cab was plunged into mayhem.
Beyond the smeared cab windows, the world degenerated into a race of madmen, causing her to forget to breathe for long tracts of time. Cars, rickshaws, trucks and a million motorbikes vied for right of way. They danced, coming together briefly, merging momentarily into a river of metal and flesh, and then springing apart again. They raced staggeringly fast for a few heartbeats before grinding once more to a halt before the next obstruction.
Pedestrians and transport of all varieties materialized out of nowhere, hurtling across their path with a frequency that suggested that this was the norm here. Vehicles, people, gaudy truck lights and scenes of impending disaster flashed before her eyes amidst an incessant cacophony of hooters and blaring horns. Underscoring the external mayhem, the frenetic pulse of a Bollywood beat and the distorted voice of a female vocalist pumped from the car’s speakers.
One motorbike zipped up alongside the taxi, momentarily trapped there by the traffic’s tide. The pillion passenger turned slowly to look at her and she stared back at him. Suddenly, the man’s face flowered in a most open and disarming smile, one that felt so at odds with her inner state that she physically recoiled. She turned away without smiling back, too lost in her own distress to face any human kindness. Elsa closed her eyes.
Damn you, Anton, she thought. You’re going to pay for this.
One and a half hours later the driver announced that they had arrived.
She paid what he asked for, not caring if he overcharged her – Anton was going to foot every bill anyway – then, ignoring the man’s ranting, she pried the handle of her suitcase from his fingers and turned away, leaving him with his car, still talking gibberish at her receding back.

-oOo-

The Institute seemed to belong to a very different world to the Delhi she had just traversed. The campus was lush with palm trees and other exotic vegetation; the buildings were old, but clean and well maintained. She found the reception, and the man at the desk stood up even as she stepped through the doors.
He came around the reception desk and bowed slightly.
“Welcome to Delhi, Miss Madison. We sent a car to pick you up from the airport, but the driver could not find you. He called us more than an hour ago, distraught by his failure.”
At least they made an effort.
“It’s okay,” she said, smiling tiredly. “I made it anyway.”
“So you did, but did you go somewhere else first? The ride from the airport is only half an hour at most …”
Elsa laughed.
“It looks like my taxi took the scenic route.”
But the other did not join in her laughter.
“In that case I must apologise for him. He took advantage of you being a foreigner. Did you notice his number by any chance?”
Elsa shook her head.
“I noticed lots of things, but no, that wasn’t one of them … but please, don’t worry. The same thing has been known to happen in Melbourne, so …”
She shrugged resignedly.
The man smiled and nodded; he then reached for the phone sitting on his desk.
“I will arrange for someone to show you to your room.”

-oOo-

Elsa had to wait until the following morning to meet the man she had been sent here to intercept. She had just come down from her surprisingly comfortable room and was studying one of the breakfast buffet tables in some confusion when a man’s voice spoke behind her.
“The Indian breakfast is far superior to the continental, but I would stay well clear of the coffee if I were you.”
The accent was unmistakably American. She turned to find a man in his mid-thirties eyeing her with an air of quiet amusement. He had brown eyes, fair skin and the stubble on his cheek looked abrasive.
“They don’t do coffee in India,” he continued. “If you want any that’s half decent you will have to go to a five star hotel or a restaurant run by European expatriates. The chai of course is always superb.”
He was busy spreading a green paste on something that looked halfway between a pancake and a pizza base.
“I do recommend the idlis,” he continued, nodding towards some rounded white patties on the table in front of her. “But go easy on the sambar, it will strip layers off your stomach lining if you have too much …”
“You must be Jason Strimel,” she said with a returning smile.
He arched an eyebrow and his expression changed from amused to calculating.
“Are you trying to impress me? Well, you have succeeded … oh, wait, you must be …”
“Elsa,” she offered. “I’m Anton’s fill in.”
Jason cocked his head and pursed his lips.
“Anton’s fill in, is it? How delightfully undiplomatic!”
Elsa shrugged.
“I was not very impressed when he informed me that I had to come in his stead …”
Jason continued to load food onto his plate.
“This your first visit to India?”
Elsa told him it was as she picked up a plate and availed herself of the food, using his selections as a guide.
“And how does it feel so far?”
They carried their plates to a table and sat down.
“Well, I only arrived last night and all I did was drive around Delhi for almost two hours. After that I slept and now I’m here … so a bit early to say, really. The problem is, I didn’t really want to come.”
“Hmm, I gathered as much …” He chewed in silence for a while.
“May I ask you why?”
“Why what?” She had been following a different train of thought and no longer knew what he was referring to.
“Why you didn’t want to come here,” he reminded her.
She chewed in turn and weighed the appropriateness of talking about such matters. In the end she shook her head.
“Actually, it’s not really so much that I didn’t want to come, it’s more like I didn’t want to leave.”
“Ah!” he replied, as if that explained everything.
Elsa realised she did not feel comfortable discussing personal matters with a stranger she had known for all of ten minutes.
“Let’s just say that I have a lot on my plate back home and I didn’t want anything getting in the way of decisions that I need to make.”
He nodded but did not press for more information, which was just as well because she had already decided not to divulge anything more. Elsa asked him about his research and they talked shop for a time and he seemed content with that.
Jason had come to Delhi to oversee the setup of a manufacturing lab for Epsilon Industries. Anton had called to inform him of the Jaipur conference and he had agreed that it held opportunities for the company that should not be missed. The lab job was done, Elsa had arrived, and even though the conference would not kick off for another few days, he saw no reason why they should not set out sooner rather than later. What did she think?
“Fine by me,” she said. “How long is the flight?”
Jason’s eyes smiled at her.
“Well, I thought driving might be a better idea …”
“Driving?” she asked, surprised, and her own smile faded as she recalled her drive from the airport.
“This is your first time in India. You will not get anything out of being here if all you do is jet-set from city to city. India is an amazing place. She has many gifts to offer, but you won’t necessarily find them in the cities.”
They finished eating and he poured them both a cup of chai and they went outside to sip it as they strolled around the compound.
“You’ve let on that you’re experiencing some problems back home … well, travelling can be a great way to gain clarity, and India … she is truly remarkable. She has a way of working herself into your heart and cleaning out what is no longer needed …”
Her scepticism must have been clearly evident because he stopped short.
“But don’t take my word for it, find out for yourself. After all, that’s the only way we ever learn anything, isn’t it?”
“Is that what happened to you here? Have you … cleaned out your heart?”
He laughed.
“I asked for that, didn’t I?”
Another spell of silence.
“I’m still finding it hard to say exactly what happened to me. Many Westerners have a hard time here; the poverty and the paradoxes can be very confronting and for some this becomes unbearable, so visitors polarise rapidly – those who love her stay, and the others leave and don’t come back. I come back at every single opportunity because I know that she has still more in store for me …”
He waved around himself.
“Her magic is everywhere, even here, in the cities. But she is harder to find here – there is too much decay, too many addictions and distractions. The true fiery, poignant heart of India is in the countryside – in the mountains and the rivers, in the villages and the thousands of temples, and most of all in the hearts of her people. That’s why you deserve a chance to experience her, and then you can make up your own mind which category you belong to …”
Elsa looked at him slantwise.
“I suspect I already know which category I belong to …”
Nothing she had seen so far had made her want to stay here one moment longer than necessary. She had no desire to go anywhere or visit anything, and now a near stranger was going to make her risk her life on a six hour car journey …
She sighed.
As if sensing her inner stance, Jason smiled. He made one of those little head wobbles that she had seen several Indians perform.
“Do not be worry, Madam! Your stay in India will be of the most very splendid and beneficial one! Of this I have the very highest of utmost certainty!”
His mimicry made her laugh, despite herself.

-oOo-

The following morning at dawn they met at the Institute gates, where a car waited for them.
Jason opened the boot and placed their luggage inside.
The driver, who had been tinkering under the bonnet, slammed it shut and walked around the back to assist them.
“This is Sajiv,” Jason introduced. “Whatever you think of his appearance, the truth is that he’s simply a Jedi master. I would not trust anyone else to take us anywhere. Driving in India is … an experience.”
Elsa shook Sajiv’s hand and he smiled at her.
There it was again, one of those incredible smiles. When people smiled here it was as if they allowed their soul to show through their eyes. Elsa found it beautiful but also slightly unsettling, as if the smile required something more from her in return.
They climbed on board and were soon weaving through the streets of Delhi.

-oOo-

The road to Jaipur was new and, for the most part, quite broad. But the three lanes of traffic in each direction soon began to seem inadequate as the congestion of traffic grew.
Sajiv’s skill became evident as he wove a fast but intricate path between the most disparate kinds of vehicles that Elsa had ever seen gathered in a single place.
She had no idea what manner of laws ruled the Indian highways, but seeing Sajiv weave his way past great colourful lorries balancing precarious loads, slow tractors, bullock-driven carts, camels and skinny horses pulling obscene loads, all she could do was shake her head in speechless wonder. She nearly lost it when she discovered that the cause of one obstruction was two cows ruminating quietly, blocking two of the three lanes.
“Cows?!” she exclaimed, and Sajiv made a half turn to laugh at her indignation. “Are they mad? What are cows doing on the road?”
“Mad cows?” offered Jason with his exasperatingly calm smile.
Elsa just resorted to shaking her head again.
Sajiv sped up, slowed down, tooted his horn liberally and flashed his high beam as he took them on the ride of their lives. At one point they even passed a truck travelling in the opposite direction just off their side of the road.
Elsa could not understand how Jason could remain so calm in the wake of such mayhem.
“You don’t find all this frightening?”
He shook his head.
“At first, yes. Now I mostly find it extraordinary. I never tire of it.”
Not knowing how to respond, she said nothing.

-oOo-

Eventually she dozed. Closing her eyes was mainly an attempt to avoid the constant tension of dealing with what was happening around them.
When she woke up the first thing she noticed was a feeling of hunger. The second was that the landscape around them had given way to brown hills that were mostly denuded of trees. The third was that they were no longer on the highway.
They were driving on what, back in Australia, would have been dismissed as an outback track. The centre of the road was sealed, but only enough to allow one car to pass. So they drove in the middle of the road and pulled off into the dirt and dust only when they met a vehicle travelling in the opposite direction.
“Where are we?” she asked.
“Still about an hour from Jaipur,” Jason admitted. “I’ve asked Sajiv to swing by Amber so you’ll get a glimpse of her before we get to the capital.”
Elsa turned towards him questioningly.
“I thought Delhi was the capital.”
“Of India, yes. But we’re in a different state now. Jaipur is the capital of Rajasthan.”
She made an ‘ah’ expression and then yawned, blinking away the last remnants of torpor.
“Who’s Amber?”
Jason grinned.
“Not who, what. You’ll find out soon enough.”
She had to be content with that.

-oOo-

Amber came into view as abruptly as a realisation.
One moment Sajiv was negotiating a lorry that had hemmed him in for some time and then as he shot out to pass the truck, she saw it.
She could not even have said in those first moments what it was that she was seeing. The apparition dominated the whole flank and crest of the hill some distance away to the left of the road. In between lay a deep gully and the surrounding land was stripped of most vegetation except for a dusting of grass that accentuated the ochre hues of the ancient structure rising, dream-like, out of the arid land.
Distantly she heard Jason instruct Sajiv to pull over.
When the car stopped, Elsa opened the door and climbed out.
The palace-fortress of Amber stood before her like a desert apparition.
And as she stared, she became aware of incomprehensible tears welling up in her eyes. She groped for support on the bonnet of the car as a stabbing pain pierced the middle of her chest and then a wail of devastation escaped from her throat.
Both Jason and Sajiv were immediately beside her.
“Elsa! What’s wrong? What’s the matter? Are you okay?”
All she could do was shake her head and continue to weep – with no reason, no cause and no sense.
“What is wrong? Elsa!”
Jason’s concern and the insistence in his voice made her turn away from Amber, but turning away from the sight of her pained Elsa even more. She gulped in a lungful of air and slowly the moment passed. The sobbing quieted by degrees and eventually it receded completely.
“I have no idea of what just happened,” she said. “I have never felt anything like this before.”
But even as she spoke the words she knew that they were not true. She had felt just this way once before, a long time ago … and now the memory of that occasion returned to her.
She looked at Amber again, but the tide of sorrow that had risen on first contact had withdrawn, leaving the shore of her awareness a frayed wasteland, strewn with the debris of fragmented and half-remembered memories.

-oOo-

The conference in Jaipur lasted five days and Elsa had to put the incident at Amber out of her mind. It was an effort of will to be present to something that suddenly seemed less than relevant, but she managed it. On the Friday afternoon, immediately after the closing ceremony, she sought Jason out.
“I have to go back there.”
He nodded, serious.
“I thought you might say something like that.”
“Can we go tomorrow?”
Jason shrugged as if she had cornered him.
“Nothing stopping us …”
Elsa sighed as if a burden had been lifted from her.

-oOo-

The fortress was just a little over half an hour from Jaipur and they arrived well before the palace had even opened for the day. Elsa and Jason were the first to be admitted through the doors of the Moon Gate and into the broad first courtyard. From there they climbed up the ancient stone steps that led to the Lion’s Gate, the main entrance. They walked in complete silence through pillared audience spaces and frescoed marble rooms, through verdant gardens teeming with monkeys, and past fountains and pools filled with clear, cool waters. They gazed at, and touched, the wonders of an age that belonged to a distant past.
Elsa wondered with a dull curiosity at her lack of response. Given the intensity of her first sighting, she had anticipated … something more than the emptiness she was now experiencing.
When they reached the Hall of Mirrors, she held her breath at the wonder of so much beauty. It was an exquisite room, carved to perfection and imbedded with mosaics made up of thousands of tiny mirrors and other shapes of coloured glass that, together, set the entire hall aglow with shimmering reflected light.
But even here she did not find what she sought.
She walked slowly though the dazzling hall and left it with a vague feeling of disappointment.
They continued on, slowly passing through every space that was open to their scrutiny.
In this way they reached a place on the roof of the palace, and stepped into a rectangular chamber with intricate, perforated marble screens which served as walls.
Elsa approached it with cautious steps as if she was purposefully crossing the threshold between reality and dream. She came to a complete stop before one of the screens and then sank onto the floor alongside it without a single word.
She leaned her temple against the marble and closed her eyes.
“Elsa?”
She nodded in response, so Jason didn’t say anything more.
After a few moments she started talking.
“When I was just a slip of a girl of maybe ten or eleven I had a dream.”
Her eyes remained closed as she talked.
“Actually it was more a vision than a dream.”
She grew silent, but her eyes moved behind the closed eyelids as she revisited what she had seen back then.
“In the vision I was looking out a window, past a screen made of marble, just like this.”
She brushed it without opening her eyes, her hand tentative, as if it was so delicate it might break if she exerted any pressure.
“Down there, below me, were crowds of people whirling around in colourful garments, dancing and singing as they made their way up towards that broad flight of steps that leads up to the stone landing where we walked earlier. I remember everything so vividly: the ramparts beyond the stairs, the distinctive crenelations that adorned them and beyond it all, the slopes of the brown barren hills.”
She paused and opened her eyes, and gazed through the marble perforations.
“It was a festive celebration, full of gaiety and happiness and I was a part of it. Coloured powders were being thrown high into the air and their rainbow hues were strewn over the dancing and celebrating crowd. Their hair, their faces and their clothes were all streaked with colour.”
Elsa brought a hand up to her breast as if to protect her chest from something.
“Then there was a sudden change in the air. It was heralded by a distressed cry and quickly followed by a hesitation in the movement of the crowd. Then there were flashes of metal followed by screams of pain and terror. Blades were drawn and the spray of coloured powders was replaced by the spray of blood. People tried to flee but their own numbers hindered them. Some fell over the walls, others jumped. They were being murdered, massacred, and I saw it. I saw it all. The women up here on the roof with me started screaming and then I was screaming too, because we all knew what was going to happen, that we were next … that we were about to die … ”
Elsa’s breathing started to convulse and her limbs trembled; nevertheless she continued her account.
“The real horror was that we were all unarmed, the men too. It was a sacred festival and weapons were forbidden. And that’s when someone made their bid for power. Through flagrant betrayal of tradition and of sacred trust …”
Her voice was lost in the convulsed spasms of too much grief and horror. Jason wrapped his arms around her and rocked her as she cried.
“Shh, shh …” he crooned over and over as he waited for the waves of her fear and grief to subside.

-oOo-

Jason continued to cradle her in silence.
Eventually, when the intensity of her sobbing eased, Elsa looked at Jason. She squeezed his hand and slowly disengaged, began to distance herself from him.
Still he said nothing. The first words had to be hers.
She cleared her throat.
“I don’t know how I ever forgot that incident …” she said. “How could I forget?”
Jason shook his head but maintained eye contact.
“It had been huge at the time; my mother was devastated with fear for me …”
She looked away and took a deep breath that quivered with the memory of her recent distress.
Suddenly she turned her gaze back to Jason.
“Why did you bring me here?”
He tilted his head and frowned questioningly.
“Before the conference, when we drove from Delhi, you asked Sajiv to swing by this place … why?”
Jason searched Elsa’s eyes. There was a shadow of accusation in the way she looked at him; a seed of doubt and uncertainty as if she was on the verge of uncovering a conspiracy.
He shrugged.
“It is a beautiful place. I just wanted you to see something beautiful.”
She nodded slowly, her eyes never straying from his.
“Because that was the moment I started to remember: when we stepped from the car. That’s when it all started to come back … then, during the week I remembered other things, peripheral to the episode itself, but important things nonetheless. It was a terrible time for me because I was just a child; I did not understand what had happened, and I had no way of explaining it to myself let alone to anyone else. I remember my parents taking me to see someone … a child psychologist or a social worker – can’t remember which. They put me in one of those machines that measure electrical impulses in the brain and after that I’m sure they wanted to medicate me. I remember trying to eavesdrop on an argument between mum and dad. I remember dad’s voice saying ‘no, no, no’ over and over. He wouldn’t have a bar of it, but mum was so frightened – she must have seen the mess I was in, and was seriously considering it.”
Jason studied her face.
He could see that Elsa had two separate layers of distress interwoven. One was enmeshed with the mysterious experience that had somehow visited her. The other was the painful ripple of consequences that had devastated her world as a ten-year-old.
How do you reconcile something like that?
“You’re looking a lot better now,” he commented. “Is there anything else you wanted to do or see while we’re still here?”
She snorted her amusement at this.
“Why, haven’t you had enough?”
He smiled.
“Not my call,” he said, standing up slowly, massaging his legs as if they had cramped.
Elsa stood up as well and after a final glance around they left the beautiful, memory-riddled palace and made their way back to the car.

-oOo-

“Do you think it was a past life?” he asked a while later, while Sajiv drove them back towards Delhi.
She looked at him, sceptical.
“Do you believe in stuff like that?”
He shrugged, and then shook his head.
“Not really. But one has to wonder. What about you?”
She shook her head slowly.
“Never gave it any thought, until now.”

-oOo-

Four weeks later Jason Strimel was in his Mumbai office when his mobile rang. He glanced at it but didn’t recognise the number.
“Strimel,” he said.
“Jason?”
His answer came after a short delay.
“Elsa?”
“Yep.”
“Hey, hi! So good to hear from you! How are you?”
Her tone sounded pleased at his response.
“I’m okay. Well, not entirely. My dad died while I was in India. I buried him last week …”
“Oh Elsa, I’m so sorry …”
“It’s okay, really. I’ve been doing a lot of crying and a lot of thinking, but you should be used to that … to the crying, I mean.”
Jason was not sure what to say next.
“Jason? Do you remember how you said that India has a way of wedging herself into some people’s hearts?”
Jason became very still.
“Yes, I remember.”
“Well, I think I’m one of those people …”
“Oh, really?” His lips had gone inexplicably dry.
“Yes. Like you said once, I don’t think she’s done with me either. Anyway, I’ve just booked a flight back to Delhi and I was wondering if you were interested in catching up?”
“Yes, of course. Absolutely! But what about your job back in Melbourne, have you taken some leave?”
“Yes, permanent leave. I told Anton that I had missed out on being by my father’s side when he passed, and that was the last thing I was going to miss for him or for Epsilon.”
“Wow! Good for you,” Jason replied. “Maybe we’ll have to take a look and see if Epsilon has a vacancy for someone like you here in India …”
Elsa laughed.
“That would be so funny!”
“So, how long are you going to stay this time?”
“Not sure … I got a one-way ticket.”
Jason’s smile shone like the Indian sun.

Leave A Reply (6 comments so far)


  1. Sandy
    2 years ago

    Thanks so much Claudio.
    I loved the story.

    [Reply]

    Claudio Silvano Reply:

    Happy you did, Sandy!

    [Reply]


  2. OOnagh
    2 years ago

    Claudio, THANK YOU.
    A passionate expression of the worlds we carry from one life time to another – some evoked into a living experience, some not. I found your words a compelling heart and soul-full example of those experiences when they are teased into life, not to be ignored. Beautiful. Thank you for the opportunity of deep reflection through your words. OOnagh.

    [Reply]

    Claudio Silvano Reply:

    Dear OOnagh,
    thank you for your generous comment!
    Sometimes things do align in such a way that one has no choice but to be left breathless in the wake of an experience that has touched the soul. Life continues, but the imprint that has been brought to the surface never really disappears again and demands expression… what a great journey we are on!
    Love & blessings to you,
    Claudio

    [Reply]


  3. Jenni
    2 years ago

    Thank you Claudio.
    That is a beautiful short story. I appreciate the opportunity to read it.
    Best of luck with the new book (I will be buying it one way or another!) and I’m glad to hear it is on the way at last.
    Kind regards, Jenni

    [Reply]

    Claudio Silvano Reply:

    Thanks Jenni,
    India REALLY is an amazing place, and there was something about the Amber Palace that stirred something in me … although to speak truly there are billions of such experiences just lurking behind every corner, ready to pounce on you unexpectedly … glad you enjoyed it.
    Many blessings,

    Claudio

    [Reply]

Keys of Awakening is here!

Keys of Awakening is here!

- - - - - And now available for purchase - - - - -

KEYS OF AWAKENING HAS BEEN PUBLISHED!

Posted 20 September 2015

Well, it's finally done!
The second volume in Destiny of Fire is out.

I've started to deliver and post out all the books to those of you who have so generously supported me in the Pozible crowd-funding venture.

If you haven't received your copy yet, you will soon enough.

I hope you enjoy the book and will give me some feedback - I've put a lot of love and energy into it.
May it reach and inspire every one of you.

And once again: thank you.